Trestles train

Trestles train

Trestles Beach attracts surfers from all over the world to experience the perfect wave. Trestles are named after the railroad bridge over San Mateo Creek near the entrance to the beach. The 3½-mile-long beach consists of five separate surf breaks: Cotton, Uppers, Middles, Lowers, and Church

To get to Trestles, you will have to walk about a mile from the parking lot down a winding paved trail. The path and the beach are posted no dogs so you will have to leave your four-legged friend home on this trek.

Trestles still is a secluded surfing spot, but a little bit of Southern California surfing history was lost with the replacement of the wooden bridge. One highlight of the new concrete bridge is the letters TRESTLES built into the new structure.

Source: https://www.daytrippen.com/trestles-beach-southern-california-surfing/

Royal Terns dancing on the beach

Royal Terns dancing on the beach at Trestles

 

The royal tern (Thalasseus maximus) is a tern in the family Laridae. The genus name is from Ancient Greek Thalasseus, “fisherman”, from thalassa, “sea”. The specific maximus is Latin for ‘”greatest”.

This bird has two distinctive subspecies: T. m. maximus which lives on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the North and South America, and the slightly smaller T. m. albididorsalis lives on the coast of West Africa. The royal tern has a red-orange bill and a black cap during the breeding season, but in the winter the cap becomes patchy. The royal tern is found in Europe, Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean islands. The royal tern lives on the coast and is only found near salt water. They tend to feed near the shore, close to the beach or in backwater bays. The royal tern’s conservation status is listed as least concern.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_tern

Trestles – the Yosemite of surfing

  • You can stand with one foot in Orange County and the other foot in San Diego County on the beach!
  • It’s a fun nature-filled walk to the beach.
  • Entertaining for the kids to watch the trains go by.
  • Off-season it was pretty quiet on the beach. Great views of Dana Point Headlands and the San Clemente coastline looking north. See the infamous San Onofre power plant and views of north San Diego to the south.
  • San Mateo Creek provides more wildlife viewing.
  • We liked walking over the concrete bridge and looking down into the creek.
  • If you’re lucky, you can see some world class surfing. In fact, type in “Trestles” on YouTube and you’ll see some fun surfing videos.
  • There’s still evidence of the fight to “Save Trestles” from a proposed tollroad.  Trestles is known as the “Yosemite of Surfing.”

Source:https://funorangecountyparks.com/trestles-beach-walk.html

Trestles beach

Trestles Beach is the northernmost part of San Onofre State Beach and of San Diego County, but access is from San Clemente in Orange County. Surfers know this area near San Mateo Point as Uppers, Lowers, and Middles for the different surf spots near the train trestle the beach is named after. Unfortunately this surf area is fraught with localism which can be seen in the various spray-painted warnings along the path to the beach. Under the trestle at the beach San Mateo Creek stagnates and sometimes flows through the sand to the ocean. This wetlands area is called Trestles Wetland Natural Preserve and it is popular with local bird-watchers. It is a long walk down the trail from the parking area to the beach (about 1 mile each way).

The parking area is located near the intersection of S El Camino Real and Cristianitos Road east of Interstate 5 in San Clemente. A dirt path begins at this intersection and dips under I-5 on the way to the beach. Another path, which is flatter and paved, begins on the other side of I-5 and can be reached by walking over the bridge. San Mateo Campground is near the beach trail parking lot. The San Mateo area of San Onofre State Beach State Park has many hiking trails to explore.

Source:https://www.californiabeaches.com/beach/trestles-beach/

 

Rancho San Clemente – trail view 3

Rancho San Clemente – trail view 3

 

This was taken during my morning run on the Rancho San Clemente trail…there is a lot of smoke from a nearby wildfires that started at Camp Pendelton on the other side of the ridge. Unfortunately wildfires are now a fact of life in CA… Everyday I thankful for the men and women fighting these fires daily #CalFire