Trestles train

Trestles train

Trestles Beach attracts surfers from all over the world to experience the perfect wave. Trestles are named after the railroad bridge over San Mateo Creek near the entrance to the beach. The 3½-mile-long beach consists of five separate surf breaks: Cotton, Uppers, Middles, Lowers, and Church

To get to Trestles, you will have to walk about a mile from the parking lot down a winding paved trail. The path and the beach are posted no dogs so you will have to leave your four-legged friend home on this trek.

Trestles still is a secluded surfing spot, but a little bit of Southern California surfing history was lost with the replacement of the wooden bridge. One highlight of the new concrete bridge is the letters TRESTLES built into the new structure.

Source: https://www.daytrippen.com/trestles-beach-southern-california-surfing/

Royal Terns dancing on the beach

Royal Terns dancing on the beach at Trestles

 

The royal tern (Thalasseus maximus) is a tern in the family Laridae. The genus name is from Ancient Greek Thalasseus, “fisherman”, from thalassa, “sea”. The specific maximus is Latin for ‘”greatest”.

This bird has two distinctive subspecies: T. m. maximus which lives on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the North and South America, and the slightly smaller T. m. albididorsalis lives on the coast of West Africa. The royal tern has a red-orange bill and a black cap during the breeding season, but in the winter the cap becomes patchy. The royal tern is found in Europe, Africa, the Americas, and the Caribbean islands. The royal tern lives on the coast and is only found near salt water. They tend to feed near the shore, close to the beach or in backwater bays. The royal tern’s conservation status is listed as least concern.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_tern