Tucson Snowstorm 2019

Tucson Snowstorm 2019

 

The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum is located on the west flank of the Tucson Mountains. Much of the range is protected by Saguaro National Park and Tucson Mountain County Park. Old Tucson Studios are located just west of the Tucson Mountains.

Tucson Mountain Park was established April 1929. The Pima County Parks Commission, with C. B. Brown as its chairman, was established to oversee the park. At approximately 20,000 acres (8,100 ha), the park is one of the largest natural resource areas owned and managed by a local government in the U.S. The park has approximately 62 miles (100 km) of non-motorized shared-use trails. The area is popular with hikers, mountain bikers, and equestrians.

Saguaro National Park was created as a National Monument in 1933 and later designated a national park in 1994.[3] The Tucson Mountain District of Saguaro National Park ranges from an elevation of 2,180 ft to 4,687 ft and contains 2 biotic communities, desert scrub, and desert grassland. Average annual precipitation is approximately 10.27 in. Common wildlife include the coyote, Gambel’s quail, and desert tortoise.[4]

According to historian David Leighton, Brown Mountain in Tucson Mountain Park, is named in honor of park founder, C.B. Brown, Kinney Road the main thoroughfare in the park, is named for Pima County Supervisor, Jack C. Kinney who worked with Brown in the creation of the park and McCain Loop was named for J.C. McCain, the first park ranger.

the desert southwest today

the desert southwest today

There are four deserts in North America. Arizona is the only state in the United States where parts of all four can be found. They are the Great BasinMojaveChihuahuan, and the Sonoran deserts. The Sonoran desert is the largest.

Source: Google

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these images were all taken during our recent 2 month winter trip as snowbirds

 

 

Superstition mountain view

Superstition mountain view

A 3,648-acre park offering camping, archery & 29 miles of multi-use trails plus scenic wind caves.

Source: https://www.maricopacountyparks.net/park-locator/usery-mountain-regional-park/

 

Hieroglyphic Trail – Superstition mountains

Hieroglyphic Trail – Superstition mountains

Most hikes into the Superstition Mountains east of Phoenix begin from the north side, accessed via the Apache Trail, and tend to be rather long and relatively little-used, but one of the shortest, easiest reached and therefore most popular routes starts in the south, at the edge of the expanding community of Gold Canyon along US 60. The 1.5 mile Hieroglyphic Trail climbs a gentle slope covered with many cacti then enters the lower end of a boulder-filled canyon, ending at a rocky section where pools persist for much of the year, a location important for the ancient Hohokam Indians, who inhabited this desert region up to 1,500 years ago. Evidence of their settlement includes hundreds of petroglyphs etched into the dark, weathered surface of the basalt cliffs above the pools, some with very intricate designs. This scenic location is high enough for a long-distance panorama southwest over Gold Canyon and the Gila River plain, and also provides close-up views of the jagged upper slopes of the Superstition Mountains to the north, rising over 2,000 feet higher.

Source: http://www.americansouthwest.net/arizona/superstition-mountains/hieroglyphic-trail.html